SANDS HOME SEARCH
A VIP INTERNATIONAL HOMES COMPANY - PRIME PROPERTY SALES & BUYING ADVISORS
Client Case Studies Planning to Sell a Property?
 

We also operate in the following areas - click on any area for further details:-

South East of England
Berkshire
Buckinghamshire
East Sussex
Hampshire

Hertfordshire

Kent

Surrey

West Sussex


South West of England
Avon
Cornwall

Devon

Dorset

Hampshire

The New Forest

Isle of Wight

Somerset

Wiltshire


Central southern England and the Midlands
Gloucestershire
Herefordshire
Oxfordshire

Warwickshire

Worcestershire


Jersey in the Channel Islands

 

Sands Home Search are independent buying consultants specialising in finding and acquiring prime country houses & estates, farm & equestrian property and waterside homes for retained private & corporate clients.

For further information about our service use the menu at the top of this page.

About the South West of England
/ West Country
(For a list of all the prime country estate properties sold in the South West of England recently, scroll down the page to find this information at the end of each particular county section)

COUNTY BY COUNTY INFORMATION - THE WEST COUNTRY, ENGLAND

Please scroll down the page for detailed information by county:


About the area of Bristol & North Somerset

Somerset
(inc area formerly known as Avon)

Chard, Frome, Cheddar, Glastonbury, Shepton Mallet, Axminster, Wincanton, Castle Cary, Ilminster, Crewkerne, Bridgwater, Taunton, Bath, Bristol, Wells and the Mendip Hills area of Somerset.

Somerset is one of the largest counties in Southern England and the changes to the scenery can be quite dramatic. In general, the county is one of well-wooded undulating countryside and consists of a flat basin surrounded on three sides by hills and on the fourth side by the Bristol Channel.

To the north-east are the Mendip Hills which are dissected by deep narrow valleys such as Cheddar Gorge which provide dramatic scenery. To the north-west is Exmoor and the Quantock Hills. The Blackdown Hills are to the south and to the east of the basin is the marshy area of Sedgemoor.

The principal rivers in the county are the Exe and the Parrett, the latter flowing through a flat reedy area drained for cultivation and known as the Somerset Levels.

The north of the county includes an area formerly known as Avon but which now has been returned to Bath and North East Somerset.

Transport to the area is reasonable with trains from Taunton to the west of the county taking approximately 100 minutes to Paddington and the fast line from Bath taking only 90 minutes. The journey from Yeovil Junction takes approximately 135 minutes to London Waterloo as it is affected by single track to the west of Salisbury.

The A303 is the main trunk road running through the county and it is mostly dual carriageway. Taunton is about a 3-hour drive to London, while Wincanton to the east is less than 2 1/2 hours. The further north or south from the A303, however, increases travel times due to busy 'A' roads and small lanes.

The M5 services the west of the county linking it to the Midlands and the North, while Bath and North East Somerset are close to the M4.

The more popular areas of the county are centred around the hills. Centres such as Shepton Mallet and Yeovil, however, are fairly second rate due to industry and urbanisation; the Somerset Levels are not so popular because of the flat landscape and the proximity of RNAS Yeovilton which is a busy airbase.

Somerset is very much a county for second homeowners or for those who work locally and, as such, property prices have kept relatively low in the more rural areas.

Closer to Bath and Bristol, however, a mini market has emerged making for higher prices in the better parts of the cities and the surrounding villages. Tourism is quite prolific but fairly spread and much less than in the Cotswolds, though summer traffic heading on to Cornwall and Devon can make for crowded roads in the summer.

Although improved connections to London have sparked interest in the local property market, Somerset remains thoroughly rural. The Chew Valley and Wells are the most popular areas to live in.

A rural county famed for its cider and cheese, Somerset also has many mystical and religious connections. Glastonbury is the New Age centre of England, and Wells has a magnificent cathedral, founded in the eighth century.

The improvement of the A303 has made the county much more accessible from London, and sparked interest in the country house market. Since the demise of the modern, and unpopular, county of Avon, the city of Bath is now once again part of Somerset, although its housing market is still largely independent from the rest of the county.

Somerset has a long coastline along the Bristol Channel, from Devon to the mouthof the River Avon, but the only natural harbour is at Watchet.

The county's varied landscape ranges from rolling valleys and hills to the crags of Cheddar Gorge and the wilderness of Exmoor to the west.

Agriculture is the main industry, but tourism also thrives, particularly round Glastonbury and in the coastal towns of Minehead and Weston-super-Mare.

Typically, houses are built of stone, including the soft-coloured Blue Lias limestone of the Somerset Levelsand the golden-yellow Ham stone in the south, with clay-tiled roofs.

The Chew Valley and the cathedral city of Wells, the smallest city in England, are among the best places in the county to live, together with Butleigh, which is close to Millfield School, and Castle Cary. Prices have risen in recent years, but they are cheaper towards the coast.

Transport links

Train: Paddington to Taunton 1hr 50min; Paddington to Yeovil, two hours; Paddington to Bath, 1hr 25min.

Car: Taunton is 148 miles from London and Wincanton 117 miles, via the M3 and A303. Bath is 110 miles, via the M4.

Public schools

Bruton School for Girls, Bruton (01749 812277). Girls only, age range 8-18, day and boarding. www.brutonschool.co.uk/

Clifton College, Bristol (0117 973 9187). Co-educational, age range 13-18, day and boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.cliftoncollegeuk.com/

Downside School, Stratton-on-the-Fosse (01761 235100). Boys only, age range 9-18, day and boarding. www.downsideabbey.co.uk/

King's School, Bruton (01749 813326). Boys aged 13-18 (co-educational sixth form), day and boarding. www.kingsbruton.org.uk/

Millfield School, Street (01458 442291). Co-educational, age range 13-18, day and boarding. www.millfield.somerset.sch.uk/

King's College, Taunton (01823 328210). Co-educational, age range 13-18, day and boarding. www.kings-taunton.co.uk/

Queen's College, Taunton (01823 272559). Co-educational, age range 8-18, day and boarding. www.queenscollege.org.uk/

Taunton School (01823 349223). Co-educational, age range 12-18, day and boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.tauntonschool.co.uk/

The Royal High School (01225 313877). Girls only, age range 4-18, day. www.gdst.net/royalhighbath/

Wells Cathedral School (01749 672117). Co-educational, age range 11-18, day and boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.wells-cathedral-school.com/

Leisure

Golfcourses: Lansdown, Bath (01225 425007); Bristol & Clifton (01275 393474); Yeovil (01935 75949); Burnham & Berrow, Burnham-on-Sea (01278 783137).

Yacht clubs: Burnham-on-Sea Yacht Club, Minehead Sailing Club.

Hunts: the Exmoor, the Taunton Vale, the West Somerset.

Staghounds: the Quantock, the Devon and Somerset.

Fishing: rivers Parrett and Axe, Chew Valley Lake, Blagdon Lake.

THE BEST SOMERSET COUNTRY HOUSES FOR SALE IN 2004
(A breakdown of what was for sale & purchase prices)

Ven House, Milbourne Port (sublime Georgian house, Grade I, 34 acres): £6.5m

Hatch Court, Hatch Beauchamp (Grade I listed, 109 acres): £5.5m

Dinder House, near Wells (Regency House, river frontage, 21.6 acres): £2.25m


Country Life - June 2005



About the County of Cornwall
(For a list of all the prime country estate properties sold in Cornwall recently, scroll down to the bottom of this page)

Newquay, St. Ives, Falmouth, St. Austell, Bodmin Moor, Lizard Point, Lands End, Redruth, Bude and Bodmin areas of Cornwall and the surrounding area of Devon.

Cornwall & Devon are packed full of attractive sea resorts. In Cornwall there are surfer's paradise areas such as Newquay on the western coast.

In North Devon these include Woolacombe, Bude, Ilfracombe, Westward Ho! and Minehead.

In South Devon you are again spoilt for choice with Lyme Regis, Sidmouth, Exmouth, Dawlish, Teignmouth, Torbay, Salcombe and Dartmouth . Further inland you will find the Dartmoor National Park and exciting local communities in towns such as Tiverton, Honiton and Barnstable.

If watersports are your life, there are many areas just suited to making this easy and pleasurable – whether your interests are in sailing, windsurfing or fishing. There are numerous moorings for your boat/watercraft, sailing clubs, watersports tuition.

If watersports are your life, there are many areas just suited to making this easy and pleasurable – whether your interests are in sailing, windsurfing or fishing. There are numerous moorings for your boat/watercraft, sailing clubs and watersports tuition.

With its own culture and language, and its spectacular scenery and warm climate, Cornwall feels a world away from the rest of England, and the current high prices are entirely justified.

Commuting to London from Cornwall is near impossible. In the past this ensured that houses in the county were remarkably good value, especially away from the south. However in recent years, as people increasingly buy second holiday homes, prices across the southwest have shot up. As a result Cornwall property is now at the top end of the price range.

According to the July 2004 Hometrack price index, the overall average price for a property in Cornwall was £154,400, compared with £153,300 in Devon and £146,800 in Somerset.

You do get what you pay for, though, which, in Cornwall, is spectacular scenery and coastline, better weather, character properties, and a peaceful way of life.

The Sea's Influence

No inhabitant of Cornwall lives more than 18 miles from the sea. Maritime trade - and piracy - may have declined, but Cornwall's coastline ensures that tourism is one of its two main industries. Rugged cliffs characterise the north coast, sunlit estuaries the south, and a third of the coast is in the hands of the National Trust.

The waters are extremely clean by European standards, and the excellent surfing breaks are becoming an increasingly important draw for visitors. Newquay's new surfing centre is proving popular, and has helped contribute to the town's newfound status as the capital of UK surfing.


Food and Drink

The sea, of course, helps contribute to another important element of Cornish life: food. Seafood is fresh and delicious, and is championed by the likes of Rick Stein, whose superb restaurant in Padstow serves only the finest - and has a waiting list to match.

That other fine Cornwall delicacy, the pasty, is also ever popular. 'Designed' so that miners could eat a good meal with dirty hands and then discard the crust, you can find almost any flavour, from the traditional beef and potato to the slightly more novel jam and custard. Malcolm Barnecutt's pasties in Wadebridge come highly recommended, but you can find good quality bakers anywhere as long as you look beyond those that cater primarily for tourists.

Lifestyle

Cornwall's other main industry is agriculture: small family farms still prevail, as the rolling landscape is not suited to large-scale farming. Beef and sheep farming are most common, while since the foot and mouth crisis crops such as oilseed rape and maize have become more prevalent.

Since the 18th century, artists have been attracted to Cornwall for its light and rugged beauty. Artists such as Norman Garstin, Barbara Hepworth and Bernard Leach have all sought inspiration in Cornwall, and there are many excellent studios and galleries in most towns.

Eden Project

One of the main draws for tourism in Cornwall is the extraordinary Eden Project. Consisting of the world's largest geodesic domes, the Project brings together a spectacular array of plants from all over the world, separated into two biospheres, the Humid Tropical Biome, featuring a jungle environment, and the Warm Temperate Biome, including Mediterranean, South African and Californian plant species. The success of the Eden Project has also had a positive knock-on effect on businesses in the surrounding area as well as the rest of the county.

Cornwall really is a world apart from the rest of Britain, with a different climate, a different language - that can still be heard in some areas - and a different lifestyle, and there can be no doubt that the high property prices are entirely justified.


Property Market

The southwest of England, especially Cornwall, has been at the forefront of the property boom over recent years. According to Colin Benney, Manager at Stratton Creber Estate Agents in Truro, prices have gone up by about 50% in this time.

Although the first six months of 2004 were very active, along with the rest of the country, the Cornish market has failed to pick up after the usual Summer lull: 'In my view prices are levelling out as supply comes more into balance with demand. It's a tougher market, with fewer transactions, but without the panic buying we were seeing earlier on in the year,' said Mr Benney.

Major towns
Penzance, Falmouth, St Ives, Truro, St Austell, Fowey, Par, Newquay, Bodmin, Bude, Launceston.


Transport links
Train: There is a direct, regular train from London Paddington to Penzance. The journey takes around 5 hours.

Plane: There are now regular, cheap Ryan Air flights from London Stansted to Newquay airport, which have no doubt helped Cornwall more attractive to second homebuyers. The journey takes just over one hour. Other operators also run flights from around the UK.

Car: Penzance is 283 miles from central London, via the M4, M5 and A30. St Austell is 265 miles.


Public schools
Duchy Grammar School, Truro (01872 862289). Co-educational, day and boarding, age range 3-18. Inter-denominational.

St Joseph's School, Launceston (01566 772988). Girls aged 4-16, boys 4-11. Day and boarding. Interdenominational.

St Petroc's School, Bude (01288 352876). Co-educational preparatory school, age range 3-14. Day and boarding. Church of England.

Bolitho School, Penzance (01736 363271). Day and boarding. Co- educational. Interdenominational. www.bolitho.cornwall.sch.uk

The Truro School, Truro (01872 272763). Co-educational, day and boarding, age range 3-18. Methodist. www.truroschool.com

Truro High School for Girls (01872 272830). Day and boarding, age range 3-18. Girls only (with boys allowed age 3- 5). Anglican. www.trurohigh.co.uk

Leisure
Yacht clubs: the Royal Torbay and the Royal Cornwall, Falmouth.

Hunting: the East Cornwall, North Cornwall, South Cornwall, Western and Four Burrow. World-class surfing at Newquay. Royal Cornwall Show held annually on its own ground at Wadebridge.

Fishing: rivers Camel, Fal, Fowey, Lyd and Tamar.

Notable golfcourses: Newquay, Rock and Padstow.

THE BEST CORNWALL COUNTRY HOUSES FOR SALE IN 2004
(A breakdown of what was for sale & purchase prices)

Trewarthenick Estate, Tregony, Truro (1737 acre estate, 2.5 miles frontage on River Fal, grounds by Repton): £9m

Country Life - June 2005


About the County of Devon
(For a list of all the prime country estate properties sold in Devon recently, scroll down to the bottom of this page)

Devon is packed full of attractive sea resorts.

In North Devon these include Woolacombe, Bude, Ilfracombe, Westward Ho! and Minehead.

In South Devon you are again spoilt for choice with Lyme Regis, Sidmouth, Exmouth, Dawlish, Teignmouth, Torbay, Salcombe and Dartmouth . Further inland you will find the Dartmoor National Park and exciting local communities in towns such as Tiverton, Honiton and Barnstable.

If watersports are your life, there are many areas just suited to making this easy and pleasurable – whether your interests are in sailing, windsurfing or fishing. There are numerous moorings for your boat/watercraft, sailing clubs, watersports tuition.

If watersports are your life, there are many areas just suited to making this easy and pleasurable – whether your interests are in sailing, windsurfing or fishing. There are numerous moorings for your boat/watercraft, sailing clubs and watersports tuition.

Devon has some excellent road links to London through the much improved A303 and M5.

This area offers a mix of breath-taking coastline, classic English inland landscapes, cosmopolitan and market towns as well as quaint chocolate box villages.

The coastal area ranges from dramatic cliffs to the numerous safe sandy beaches for which this area is famous. Inland you will find rolling downlands, hidden valleys and woodland.

The houses that command the highest premiums in Devon are close to Exeter, while the north of the county is less developed and less easily accessible from London, hence prices are lower.

Together with neighbouring Cornwall, Devon has the mildest climate in England; it is also the only other county to boast both an Atlantic and a Channel coast. No part of Devon is further than 25 miles from the sea, boosting the tourist industry.

The county's other main source of income is agriculture, in particular dairy farming, favoured by the high rainfall and long grass-growing season.

Exmoor and Dartmoor attract many visitors, and Dartmoor especially is a popular place to live. Yet the houses that command the highest premiums in Devon are close to Exeter on the south coast, particularly along the Exe estuary and further east to Sidmouth. Also popular is the South Hams, round Dartmouth, Salcombe and Totnes.

The north of the county is less developed and less easily accessible from London, hence prices are lower. Houses are typically built of stone with slate roofs; Devon longhouses of stone or cob are particularly in demand.

Major towns

Plymouth, Paignton, Torquay, Exeter, Exmouth, Dartmouth, Sidmouth, Newton Abbot, Barnstaple, Salcombe, Ilfracombe.

Transport links

Train: Paddington to Plymouth three hours, £51.10 for a Saver return. Paddington to Exeter two hours, Saver return £47.20.Plane: Gatwick to Plymouth 1hr 5min direct, from £99 return (including a Saturday night stay) with British Airways.Car: Plymouth is 221 miles from central London, via the M4, M5 and A38; Exeter is 174 miles, via the M4 and M5.

Public schools

West Buckland School, Barnstaple (01598 760281). Co-educational, age range 11-18, day and boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.westbuckland.devon.sch.uk

Shebbear College, Beaworthy (01409 281228). Co-educational, age range 3-18, day and boarding. www.shebbearcollege.co.uk

Grenville College, Bideford (01237 472212). Co-educational, age range 3-18, day and boarding. www.grenville.devon.sch.uk

Bramdean Grammar School, Exeter (01392 273387). Co- educational, age range 11-18, day and boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.bramdeanschool.co.uk

Exeter School (01392 273679). Co- educational, age range 7-18, day. www.exeterschool.devon.sch.uk

The Maynard School, Exeter (01392 273417). Girls only, ages 7-18, day. www.maynard.co.uk

Plymouth College (01752 203300). Co- educational, age range 7-18, day and boarding. www.plymouthcollege.com

Kelly College, Tavistock (01822 612010). Co-educational, age range 11-18, day and boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.kellycollege.com

Blundell's School, Tiverton (01884 252543). Co-educational, age range 13-18, day and boarding. www.blundells.org

Leisure

Golf courses: Saunton, Braunton (01271 812436). Royal North Devon, Westward Ho! (01237 473824).

Hunts: the Tiverton, the Dartmoor, the South Devon, the Spooners and West Dartmoor, the East Devon, the Stevenstone, the Lamerton, the Eggesford, the Dulverton East, the Dulverton West and the Tetcott.

Staghounds: the Tiverton, the Devon and Somerset.

Yacht clubs: the North Devon Yacht Club, the Brixham Yacht Club, the Royal Dart Yacht Club, the Royal Western Yacht Club of England, the Island Cruising Club at Salcombe and the Royal Torbay Yacht Club.

Fishing: rivers Exe, Otter, Teign, Taw and Torridge.


THE BEST DEVON COUNTRY HOUSES FOR SALE IN 2004
(A breakdown of what was for sale & purchase prices)

Endsleigh Estate, near Tavistock ('bijou' country estate): £3.25m

Gurrow Point, Dartmouth (contemporary 7 bed house, frontage to River Dart, 78.5 acres): £3m

Morebath Manor, Bampton (Grade II, 9 beds, 21 acres): £2m


Country Life - June 2005

About the County of Dorset
(For a list of all the prime country estate properties sold in Dorset recently, scroll down to the bottom of this page)

Sandbanks, Poole, Charmouth, Weymouth, Dorchester, Wimborne, Colehill, Wareham, Swanage, Studland, Lulworth, Burton Bradstock, Sherborne, Beaminster and Bournemouth Areas of Dorset.

Dorset divides into three separate areas. To the north of the county you have an area from Shaftesbury across to Sherborne in the Blackmore Vale, downland of Cranborne Chase. In the south-east there is the more urban area around Bournemouth and Poole. To the west, along the coast through Dorchester and Bridport, is the very rural area of West Dorset.

The transport to North Dorset is quite good. Shaftesbury is about 2 hours from London by the M3 and A303 and the line operated by South West trains through Salisbury is quite accessible via Waterloo, though it is not a fast train with the line from Salisbury to Yeovil Junction being single track for some sections.

The area around Bournemouth is considerably better served by rail and road with fast trains via Southampton and the M3 and M27 motorways.

West Dorset is a 3 hour drive from London and with poor roads once you get off the M27 or the A303. The trains are slow and journey times about the same as for driving.

North Dorset is now a popular area for weekenders and for those now able to use technology to work at home one or more days a week. The combination of reasonable transport and beautiful countryside has forced prices up rapidly over the last few years. Particularly popular is Cranborne Chase and Shaftesbury as well as the very pretty country around Sherborne. The Blackmore Vale tends to be slightly less popular as there are fewer quality houses and some of the countryside is quite flat. Having said that, there is strong demand for good farmhouses in that area.

From a country house market point of view, south-east Dorset is rather too urbanised to be very popular. Bournemouth and Poole are sprawling urban areas with everything that goes with it. There is an ever increasing cosmopolitan feel to Sandbanks and the adjoining areas of Branksome Park, Canford Cliffs and Lilliput as awareness increases of the improved lifestyle that can be achieved through living here. Much of the countryside has some of the characteristics of the New Forest to the east – heathland with acidic soil.

West Dorset is one of the most rural areas of southern England. There are no major roads, railway lines or airports and no commercial centre of any size. The coast is very beautiful from the Isle of Purbeck westwards but, like most beauty spots, it tends to be affected by tourists in the summer months. The countryside inland is lovely, with pretty villages and relatively undisturbed local life – the limited transport to and from London keeping prices down and commuters away.

Dorset has a wide range of country houses, and the peace of the place appeals to many families, not least because of the quality of schooling available.

There are no motorways in Dorset, as residents are fond of saying, and a large proportion of the county is made up of designated areas of outstanding beauty. No wonder people from London and the increasingly overstretched home counties are looking south and west.

Dorset is satisfyingly remote for many, but at the same time a more reasonable journey to the capital, making it all the more attractive to those who still maintain links to London.

The main towns are Sherborne, Wimborne and Dorchester, although most of the county, and its character, is to made up of innumerable villages and small towns which are peppered throughout the landscape.

Dorset can be divided into three areas: the vales of the west and north-west; the chalk uplands of the centre; and the marshes of the east and south-east. The coast, along the English Channel, has spectacular sights such as Lulworth Cove and Portland Bill.

Many families have lived in Dorset for generations, and the Elizabethan manor houses for which the county is famous are rare and expensive. There are, however, many good manor houses, old rectories and farmhouses to be found, particularly in the north and west.

Building stone is abundant and good, and includes Portland stone and Purbeck stone to the south of the county. The most expensive houses in Dorset are in Bournemouth and Poole, particularly on the Sandbanks Peninsula in Poole Harbour. Sea Views are always a bonus.

However, prices throughout the county are generally high, as roads and trains to London are fairly good; the same effect is seen to the north of the county, close to the A303. Further west prices were lower, but now compete with the rest of the county, and houses in or near towns and villages such as Sherborne and Cerne Abbas still command a premium.

Simon Jones from Savills in Wimbourne says: Things have changed a little bit in Dorset, but there are still good houses coming onto the market. A pretty house in a good location will always be popular. Prices have come down a little bit on last year, but for the right property, prices are still very competitive.'

In the West, Beaminster and Sherborne are popular, as is the stretch between Wimborne and Salisbury and Shaftsbury as well.

Many houses are being bought as main residences for families where the father works in London while the mother stays in the county during the week, keeping on a house in the capital which they later sell to look for a farmhouse in the county.

One of the reasons it is so popular with families is that schooling in Dorset is well known for being at an extremely high standard.

'Demand for good country houses has increased amongst people who can work from home, or only need to be on London for a couple of days a week,' continues Mr Jones. 'And this combined with the second homes market and the growing retirement market led to rocketing prices between 2003-2004.

'These high prices have been tempered slightly by the overall market performance this year, but a good house in the right place will still command a high price. Nearby roads, though, can be a huge disincentive – when people move to an area for peace and quiet, road noise puts people off considerably,' he continued.

Simon Barker from Knight Frank added: 'In my opinion prices have not fallen but they have hardened. We did have a pretty good rise before this though, and what you see here is only what you will see in the rest of the country.

'There is absolutely no question that there is still very good demand for a decent house properly priced,' he stresses.

Charlie Bladon from Jackson-Stops & Staff in Sherborne agrees: 'The key when selling is to get the price right. There are less buyers but the ones who are looking are extremely serious, which is unusual for this time of year when normally we have a lot of prospective buyers just looking around, not set on a purchase.'


Major towns

Dorchester, Weymouth, Poole, Bournemouth, Christchurch, Blandford Forum, Sherborne, Beaminster, Bridport, Lyme Regis, Shaftesbury.

Transport links

Train: Waterloo to Bournemouth 1hr 40min; Waterloo to Sherborne, 2hr.

Car: Bournemouth is 110 miles from central London, via the M3; Sherborne, 125 miles, via the M3 and A303.

Public schools

Bryanston School, Blandford Forum (01258 452411). Co-educational, age range 13-18, day and boarding. www.bryanston.co.uk

Clayesmore School, Iwerne Minster (01747 812122). Co-educational, age range 13-18, day and boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.clayesmore.net

Milton Abbey School, Blandford Forum (01258 880484). Boys only, age range 13-18, day and boarding. www.miltonabbey.co.uk

Talbot Heath, Bournemouth (01202 761881). Girls only, age range 3-18, day and boarding. www.talbotheath.org

Sherborne School (01935 812249). Boys only, age range 13-18, boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.sherborne.org

Sherborne School for Girls (01935 812245). Girls only, age range 12-18, day and boarding. www.sherborne.com

Canford School, Wimborne (01202 841254). Co- educational, age range 13-18, day and boarding. www.canford.com

Leisure

Golf courses: Came Down, Dorchester (01305 812531); Isle of Purbeck, Studland (01929 450361); Lyme Regis (01297 442963); Sherborne, (01935 812 475)

Yacht clubs: the Lilliput Sailing Club, Poole; the Parkstone Yacht Club, Poole; Poole Harbour Yacht Club; the Royal Dorset Yacht Club, Weymouth.

Hunts: the Blackmore and Sparkford Vale, the Portman, the Cattistock and the South Dorset.

Fishing: rivers Frome, Piddle and Stour.

THE BEST DORSET COUNTRY HOUSES FOR SALE IN 2004
(A breakdown of what was for sale & purchase prices)

Chedington Court, near Beaminster (Grade II Jacobean mansion, 17.78 acres): £7.175m


Country Life - June 2005

About the County of Hampshire & The Isle of Wight
(For a list of all the prime country estate properties sold in Hampshire recently, scroll down to the bottom of this page)

Winchester, Southampton, Basingstoke, Hamble, Portsmouth, Fareham and The New Forest Areas of Hampshire and The Isle of Wight.

Hampshire has a mixture of very pretty countryside and good rail links to Waterloo station and the City of London – with correspondingly high property values.

The county divides into the commuting areas in the north, centred on the characterless town of Basingstoke. South and west of Basingstoke is some beautiful countryside and villages, including the famous trout rivers, the Test and Itchen with the historic and charming city of Winchester in the centre of the county. In the south is the conurbation of Southampton, Fareham and Portsmouth served by the M27 motorway. To the west is the New Forest, a large protected area of heathland and woodland popular for walking and riding with the town of Lymington and the Beaulieu river providing some good sailing facilities. On the eastern border of the county is the market town of Petersfield, which is close to the beautiful unspoilt South Downs of West Sussex.

Communications are excellent. The fast trains from Basingstoke to Waterloo take approximately 45 minutes and from Winchester approximately 60 minutes. The M3 motorway connects Basingstoke, Winchester and Southampton to London and provides access to the West Country via the A303 trunk road and the south coast via the M27 motorway. Petersfield is connected to south London by the A3 dual carriageway and trains to Waterloo, which take approximately 70 minutes.

Hampshire is renowned for its private schools. In particular, Winchester has a good choice of pre-prep, prep and public schools, Winchester College and St Swithun’s Girls School being the best known.

The country house market in Hampshire is particularly popular for those moving out of London with young families looking for commuting facilities and good schools. The best commuting areas are south of Basingstoke to the charming small market town of Alresford and west towards the town of Andover. Property values are similar around Winchester but south of the M27 it is densely populated and difficult to commute to London and consequently cheaper. The New Forest is popular with local buyers working in Southampton and weekenders from London attracted by the sailing. It is considered by most buyers to be too far to commute to London.

'Hampshire has something almost everybody wants,' says Ed Cunningham, from FPD Savills. But he is not just talking about proximity to London, he is talking about the varied nature of much of the county. From the horse-lovers' New Forest to the beaches for sailing and watersports, Hampshire for those who live there is more than just a convenient commute.

With developing centres such as Portsmouth and Southampton and a rapidly expanding airport (Southampton International), fantastic schools, sailing, riding and plenty of Michelin starred restaurants, Hampshire is totally self sufficient, and has the advantage of being lived-in all year round, rather than suffering from the seasonal fluctuations which mark out areas made up mostly of second homes.

For many reasons, entering the Hampshire property market is extremely difficult. Mark Potter, from Knight Frank's Basingstoke office claims that in quintessential Hampshire villages such as Upton Gray, it is virtually impossible to buy a house. 'The Hampshire property market is on fire,' says Potter, 'Demand is great and supply is very short'.

Potter claims the area surrounding Basingstoke is one of the most sought after in the county. 'You can be in London in 42 minutes and many of the nice houses are within only 10 or 15 minutes of train stations and good schools', he says. According to Potter Odium, Dummer, Monk Sherborne and Upton Gray are the prettiest villages, 'People forget Watership Down is in Hampshire,' he comments.

Only houses that are not correctly priced or have a major problem (railways, pylons, roads) stick on the market, the rest sell competitively.

However, taking a different tack, education, education, education is the mantra of Mr Cunningham at Savills in Winchester: 'We see lots of families looking to move to the area who come down, and see which of the schools they can get their children into, and then start to look for a house in that area,' he says.

And any parents looking to find good schools are spoilt for choice in terms of quality, if a little pushed when it comes to getting all the children accepted: places are highly prized. And rightly so, as many of these are considered to be amongst the finest schools in the country.

Apart from schools, however, there are other differences in area and in atmosphere which make the difference between a high price and an extremely high price, points out Mr Cunningham, and much of this has to do with who owns the land near a property.

Hampshire now commands such high prices for land that many landowners are tempted to sell when in need of a quick cash injection, and therefore areas which are owned by large estates, or which are protected from development are considered to be more desirable in what can feel like a crowded county. In short, people are willing to pay for what they know will be seclusion, rather than worrying about new builds encroaching on a peaceful community without warning.

Interestingly some of the highest prices for Hampshire properties recently are being paid in the New Forest area, where a London commute is not really an option, explains George Hyde of Knight Frank: 'It is an extremely nice area with no big roads and Lymington is a very nice centre,' he points out.

The New Forest was traditionally the haunt of the extremely horsey, or those who wanted a second home, rather than a primary residence, but since it won National Park status, the Forest is becoming more popular with those who do not have to be in London for every single working day of the week, and who admire the wildlife and landscape such a place provides, even if the tourists in summertime can be somewhat taxing.

But although hotspots will come and go in Hampshire, the one thing you can be sure of is that good property will be in high demand when it comes onto the market, a fact reflected in the prices. 'We always say nothing is recession proof,' says Mr Cunningham, 'But we are about as close as it gets!'

The advice from most agents is that Hampshire is a county where you will pay a higher price on a property than you would in any of the neighbouring counties, merely because it is Hampshire. Therefore the most important thing is to understand the area and surroundings you buy in, and find out the potential for development, to ensure you get value for your money - once you've found those crucial school places, of course.

Major towns

Southampton, Portsmouth, Basingstoke, Winchester, Alton, Andover, Farnborough, Stockbridge, Lymington, Gosport; (Isle of Wight) Newport, Cowes, Ryde.

Transport links

Train: Waterloo to Southampton 1hr 10min; to Portsmouth 1hr 30min; to Basingstoke 45min.

Car: Southampton is 80 miles and Basingstoke 48 miles from central London via the M3; Portsmouth is 74 miles via the A3(M) and A3.

Public schools

Bedales School, Petersfield (01730 300100). Co-educational, age range 3-18, day and boarding. Associated preparatory school. www.bedales.org.uk

King Edward VI School, Southampton (01703 704561). Co-educational, age range 11-18, day. www.kes.hants.sch.uk

The Pilgrims' School, Winchester (01962 854189). Boys only, age range 7-13, day and boarding. www.pilgrims-school.co.uk

Portsmouth High School (01705 826714). Girls only, age range 4-18, day. www.pdst.net/portsmouthhigh

St Swithun's School, Winchester (01962 861316). Girls only, age range 8-18 (boys and girls, 3-8), day and boarding. www.stswithuns.com

St Mary's College, Southampton (01703 671267). Co- educational, age range 11-18, day. www.stmaryscollege.co.uk

The Portsmouth Grammar School (01705 819125). Co-educational, age range 4-18, day. www.pgs.co.uk

Winchester College (01962 854328). Boys only, age range 13-18, day and boarding. www.winchestercollege.org

Leisure

Golf courses: Royal Winchester (01962 852462).

Hunts: the Hampshire (HH), Mr Goschen's, the Hursley Hambledon, the Isle of Wight and the New Forest.

Staghounds: the New Forest.

Yachting clubs: the Royal Southampton, Ocean, Royal Solent, Royal Southern and Royal Lymington Yacht Clubs; (Isle of Wight) Island Sailing Club, Cowes Corinthian, Royal Corinthian, Royal London and Royal Victoria Yacht Clubs and the Royal Yacht Squadron.

Fishing: rivers Avon, Bourne, Itchen and Test.


THE BEST HAMPSHIRE COUNTRY HOUSES FOR SALE IN 2004
(A breakdown of what was for sale & purchase prices)

Deane House, Basingstoke (classic Georgian): £6.5m

Moundsmere, Preston Candover (14 bedroom house, 83 acres): £6m

South Hall House, Preston Candover (classic Georgian house): £5m

Morestead Manor, Twyford (Grade 11* stabling, 51.5 acres): £2.8m

Peake Farm, Warnford, Winchester (690 acre estate, 5 houses): £4.815m

Cawley Manor, Kimpton (neo-Georgian house): £2.9m

Dawn House, Winchester (Grade II 6 bedroom house): £2m

Hall Farm, Bentworth, Alton (6 bedroom house, 4.8 acres): £2.5m

Fairfields, Godshill, Isle of Wight (Grade II, 17.5 acres): £2.5m

Source: Country Life


About The New Forest National Park
(For a list of all the prime country estate properties sold in the New Forest recently, scroll down to the bottom of this page)

Sway, Boldre, Thorney Hill, Beaulieu, Norleywood, Lymington, Burley, Lyndhurst and Brockenhurst area of The New Forest National Park in Hampshire.

To live in the New Forest is a pure delight, the envy of all that see it.

The whole area is heavily restricted regarding further development, which is a bonus for those who make it their home.

The New Forest was traditionally the haunt of the extremely horsey, or those who wanted a second home, rather than a primary residence, but since it won National Park status, the Forest is becoming more popular with those who do not have to be in London for every single working day of the week, and who admire the wildlife and landscape such a place provides, even if the tourists in summertime can be somewhat taxing.

There is the benefit of many idyllic villages with beautiful countryside where you can relax and enjoy the peacefulness of the truly wonderful forest surroundings. In particular Lyndhurst, Burley, Brockenhurst, Lymington and Beaulieu are picturesque New Forest.

Forest ponies and livestock ramble free and with most gardens backing directly onto the Forest, this presents a conversation over the fence with a difference! Pony trekking, horse riding and forest rambling are all available to be freely enjoyed here.

The picturesque village of Beaulieu, close to Lymington and Lyndhurst at the head of the Beaulieu River, might best be described as "the Historic Heart of the New forest", its origins date back to the 13th century and the days of King John. No other place in the forest can match Beaulieu for historic interest.

The village grew up around Beaulieu Abbey, founded in 1204 by Cistercian Monks on land given to them by King John, who had a royal hunting lodge at Beaulieu - Bellus Locus Regis, the beautiful place of the King - and the monks who came over from CITEAUX in France re-christened it in their own tongue `Beaulieu' but it came to be pronounced "Bu-Lee" as it is still today.

The abbey thrived until 1538 when, during the Dissolution of the Monasteries, Henry VIII ordered the destruction of the religious buildings beyond the possibility of restoration. Some buildings which could be put to secular use were allowed to remain.

Beaulieu passed into the ownership of the present Lord Montagu's ancestor Sir Thomas Wriothesley and has been the ancestral home of the Montagu Family ever since, and remains thus to this day.

The 8,000 acre estate has been in the ownership of the Montagu Family for nearly 500 years. The present Lord Montagu of Beaulieu is a well known motoring personality who founded Britain's National motor Museum, internationally recognised as one of the finest in the world.

The museum holds over 300 exhibits and include world class examples of automotive interest, from early examples of motoring from the 1890's to legendary motor vehicles from all over the world, including record breakers such as " Bluebird" and "Golden Arrow"

In the village of Beaulieu the visitor can find many attractions and places to visit, the gently sloping High street has an interesting variety of village stores, ranging from specialist gift and chocolate shops to art and craft.
Beaulieu River provides an ideal location for a leisurely stroll or a place to relax beside for a picnic.

This large and attractive village lying just a few miles south of Lyndhurst, is one of the outstanding locations of the forest, making an ideal spot to stop and enjoy a walk or picnic, and watch the ponies and other animals graze around you.

Brockenhurst, meaning "badgers home" in Celtic, is one of the largest villages in the New Forest. It still retains an air of old world charm. it is here the ponies, donkeys and cows roam freely, and drink from the watersplash at the bottom of the main street on their way to graze the open heathland and ancient woods which surround the village.

Easily accessible by road and inter-city rail service, Brockenhurst is within a few miles of the sea and the heart of the forest is only a few minutes walk away.

The village is well known for a diversity of shops, tea rooms, pubs and high quality restaurants. There are also forest tours with wagon and horses, forest walks, of varying lengths, some waymarked with explanatory notes to help visitors. Every year there is a village fête on the Bank Holiday Monday in August.


Many parts of the forest, hidden to the motorist are easily accessible by bicycle on designated gravel tracks, horse riding is another activity well catered for by the town, local riding establishments cater for all ages and abilities.

In Late July The New Forest show takes place in New Park just a few minutes drive from the centre of the village.

Buckler's Hard was built in the 18th century as a ship building village community. The village played host to the naval dockyard in the late 18th century and many famous warships from the era were built in the village using timber from the Forest.

The most famous boats built here were Lord Nelson's Agamemnon and HMS illustrious. The original shipbuilder's cottages still remain and now act as a maritime museum. This is well worth visiting as the museum offers an insight into the life and times of the naval dockyard and the village community, and features many interesting naval artifacts.

Burley: Set deep in the Forest to the west of Brockenhurst, this village is extremely popular with a wealth of tea rooms, gift shops, art galleries and a Pick Your Own Farm. Burley features everything you would expect from a traditional, old, New Forest village.

When in Burley do not be surprised to see ponies and cattle roaming freely around the village, picturesque thatched cottages tucked away in unexpected places help conjure up how life was in the past. Burley has remained untouched by time, steeped in old customs and history, enabling visitors to unwind and enjoy its tranquil simplicity.

Outside the village miles of open heathland provide good walking, cycling and riding. Burley was a famous centre for smuggling and is renowned for its association with witches, both ancient and modern.

For some Lyndhurst is just a thoroughfare for the journey to Southampton, but if those people driving through stopped in the village they would discover just how much it has to offer.

Lyndhurst has been the "Capital" of the Forest area since William the Conqueror established the area as a royal hunting ground in 1079, and has been visited by Kings and Queens throughout the centuries who came to stay at the Royal Manor.

A must for any visitor to Lyndhurst is the New Forest Museum, an unique guide into the Forest's history and heritage. The museum details the development of the Forest since its creation by William the Conqueror, and provides a first-hand exhibition of life and work in the Forest and demonstrates the best the Forest has to offer.

Lyndhurst which offers the visitor a wide range of shops, both high street names and those exclusive to the village, popular with those seeking that special souvenir of their visit to the Forest. And naturally there is a wide range of tea rooms pubs cafes and restaurants to discover.

Lymington is a bustling, colourful town with lots to see and do. Its Georgian High Street is the venue for a well-known street-market every Saturday morning. This is the busiest time for the town, and the popular market boasts a range of stalls selling everything from local fine foods to craftwork and antiques. Visitors can enjoy the hustle and bustle of this unique shopping experience, where you can browse at your leisure. The high street also offers an extensive range of shops, some very familiar, others as unique and individual as the town itself. When weariness sets in, there are many parks, cafés and restaurants and, of course, pubs in which to relax and unwind.

The town's many features include a unique series of cobbled streets leading down to the pretty main quay area, popular with visitors who wish to sit, relax and watch the world sail by. Boat trips around the Solent can be taken from the quayside and private sailing, motor-boating and fishing trips may be arranged at short notice. For those wishing to adventure further afield, Yarmouth on the Isle of Wight is reached by ferry in only 35 minutes, and caters for both foot passengers and cars.

Other facilities in the town include a well-equipped leisure centre with heated pool, and the historic outdoor Roman seawater baths, very popular on a hot summer's day and only a short walk from the main quay area.

Fordingbridge is a small country town on the banks of the River Avon. It was recorded in the Domesday book and the name has evolved through the years from `Forde' and `Bridge'.
The first Great Bridge, built in medieval times, is up stream from the ford and is a major feature of the town with its seven graceful arches.

Once an industrial town and commercial centre, Fordingbridge boasted many trades such as brickmaking, pottery and textiles. It was also noted for its smuggling and the infamous Captain Diamond, the `Smuggler King' spent much of his time here in a local hostelry. The town has developed into a wonderful place for visitors with its beautiful scenery, nature havens, cycleways and welcoming people.

Nestling in the Southern edge of the New Forest, four miles from the coast at Lymington, Sway is a shining example of a quiet but thriving village community, renowned for its friendliness and offering a good range of shops, services, pubs, restaurants and accommodation.

In Victorian times Captain Marryatt used the surrounding countryside as the backdrop to his "Children of the New Forest", the somewhat eccentric Judge Peterson built the 220 foot Sway tower as a celebration of concrete and St. Luke's Church was established at the heart of what was then principally a rural community.

The arrival of the railway in the late 1880s opened up new opportunities and the following decades saw the village expand impressively. Today regular train services link the village with Dorset and London and all points North.

Accessibility & Surrounding Areas.

Both Dorset and Hampshire have excellent road links to London through the much improved M3, M27 and A31 dual carriageway.

The New Forest is well served by regular daily fast trains from Waterloo with journey times of approximately 1 hour 30 minutes.

There are also good airports at both Southampton and Bournemouth servicing most Western European countries and the Canary Islands.

Sailing to France and Spain is comprehensively served by the main Ferry companies, Brittany Ferries, P&O Ferries and Condor Ferries from ports at Poole, Weymouth and Portsmouth. In addition there are regular ferry services to the Isle of Wight and the Channel Islands of Jersey and Guernsey.

The larger towns such as Southampton and Winchester offer more urban developments. Southampton has the benefit of the port and quayside for which you can spend many hours watching life pass by. Winchester is a truly beautiful city, a pleasure to live in and around.

Schools

Hordle Walhampton School, Lymington, Hampshire, SO41 5ZG
01590 627013

Brockenhurst College
(01590) 625555

Leisure

Golf courses: Brockenhurst, Burley

Hunts: the Hampshire (HH), Mr Goschen's, the Hursley Hambledon, the Isle of Wight and the New Forest.

Staghounds: the New Forest.

Yachting clubs: the Royal Southampton, Ocean, Royal Solent, Royal Southern and Royal Lymington Yacht Clubs; (Isle of Wight) Island Sailing Club, Cowes Corinthian, Royal Corinthian, Royal London and Royal Victoria Yacht Clubs and the Royal Yacht Squadron.


THE BEST NEW FOREST COUNTRY HOUSES FOR SALE IN 2004/05
(A breakdown of what was for sale & purchase prices)

The Tukal, Beaulieu, New Forest (Architect designed, 19,000 sq ft, 12 acres with direct water frontage): £5m

St Leonards Grange, Bucklers Hard (Grade II* listed, with Grade 1 Abbey ruins): £2.75m



About the County of Wiltshire
(For a list of all the prime country estate properties sold in Wiltshire recently, scroll down to the bottom of this page)

Devizes, Seend, Melksham, Swindon, Salsibury, Warminster, Salisbury Plain, Burbage, Pewsey, Marlborough, Wroughton, Highworth, Chippenham, Lacock, Urchfont, Bradford on Avon, Shrewton, Wilton and the Tisbury area of Wiltshire.

Despite its great landed estates, such as Wilton and Longleat, Wiltshire still has a proliferation of family houses, although demand sometimes exceeds supply.

The large county of Wiltshire divides into two distinct areas – north and south – with the vast military training area of Salisbury Plain in the centre.

North Wiltshire is dominated by downland from the M4 to Salisbury Plain. This area is very rural with villages situated in the valleys and Marlborough as an attractive market town. The Vale of Pewsey is particularly popular with buyers due to its beauty and good train links.

Swindon to the north of the M4 is an industrial, unattractive town with many "out-of-town" business parks and factories such as Honda UK. The land to the north and west of Swindon is uninspiring until it meets the South Cotswolds at Badminton. The area from the Downs stretching to the east of Bath is rather built up. Chippenham, Melksham, Devizes and Calne are the main urban areas and it is possible to buy a lot of house for your money here compared with the shires closer to London. Bradford-on-Avon is an oasis in what is otherwise a lesser area and is far enough away from RAF Lyneham, home to the Hercules Squadron, which over-flies much of the area. North Wiltshire is well served for schools, in particular Marlborough and St. Mary?s, Calne.

Salisbury Plain can be bleak, particularly in winter. Much of the Plain is affected by the Ministry of Defence who regularly hold exercises over several days. The noise from these military exercises and the garrisons in the valleys dampens property prices in the area.

There are mainline stations into London Paddington at Pewsey (approximately 60 minutes), Swindon (approximately 60 minutes), Bath (approximately 90 minutes) and Chippenham (approximately 75 minutes). The M4 motorway runs through north Wiltshire and offers accessibility to London in less than 2 hours.

South Wiltshire is a small but very popular area which is bordered to the north by the Plain, to the east by Salisbury itself and running southwestwards towards Shaftesbury, Blandford Forum and the Dorset border.

The landscape changes dramatically to the south of the Plain with pretty wooded chalk stream valleys and stone villages. The main valleys running through south Wiltshire are the Woodford Valley to the north of Salisbury, the Wylye Valley running to the north-west, the Nadder Valley running due west and the Chalke Valley which provides dramatic scenery as it runs south-westwards into Cranborne Chase.

South Wiltshire is a great draw for second homeowners, being just on the fringe of reasonable commuting distance from London. It is also popular with those who are able to work from home for part of the week, and the good schools in Salisbury and around Shaftesbury have led to an influx of those moving full time to the area.

There are mainline stations into London Waterloo at Salisbury (approximately 90 minutes) and Tisbury (approximately 110 minutes). The majority of the A303, which joins the M3 west of Basingstoke, is dual carriageway and it is possible to reach central London from south Wiltshire by car in under 2 hours.

Despite its great landed estates, which include Wilton and Longleat, Wiltshire still has a proliferation of good family houses, although demand sometimes exceeds supply. Many of the county's manor houses, farmhouses and rectories are pre-Victorian.

It is only this century that Wiltshire's popularity has surged. This is largely thanks to good communications to London, although the county's appealing landscapes have played a part. Wiltshire remains predominantly rural, and Swindon is its only major town. Agriculture is still important, but new, high-tech industries are now springing up along the M4 corridor.

The county's wide, open spaces, such as Salisbury Plain - the largest expanse of chalk grassland in England - contrast with secluded river valleys; to the north-west of the county are hills overlaid with clay.

Wiltshire also is rich in prehistoric sites, from Avebury and Silbury Hill in the north to Stonehenge in the south.

Ease of access to London means that house prices are buoyant. The most popular areas are those where road and rail links to the capital are good, such as close to the M4 in the north and A303 in the south.

Wiltshire's villages and isolated houses tend to be prettier than its towns, where prices are lower.

Major towns

Swindon, Salisbury, Calne, Chippenham, Devizes, Trowbridge, Malmesbury, Marlborough, Warminster and Westbury.

Transport links

Train: Paddington to Swindon 55min; Paddington to Chippenham, 1hr 10min; Waterloo to Salisbury 1hr 20min.

Car: Swindon is 76 miles from central London and Chippenham 93 miles, via the M4. Salisbury is 85 miles, via the M3 and A30.

Public schools

St Mary's School, Calne (01249 815899). Girls only, age range 11-18. Day and boarding. www.stmaryscalne.wilts.sch.uk/

Dauntsey's School, West Lavington (01380 812446). Co-educational, age range 11-18. Day and boarding. www.dauntseys.wilts.sch.uk/

Marlborough College (01672 892200). Co-educational, age range 11-18. Boarding. www.marlboroughcollege.org/

The Godolphin School, Salisbury (01722 333059). Girls only, age range 7-18. Day and boarding. www.godolphin.org/

Salisbury Cathedral School (01722 322652). Co-educational, age range 3-13. Day and boarding. www.salisburycathedralschool.com/

Stonar School, Melksham (01225 702309). Girls only, age range 4-18. Day and boarding. www.stonar.wilts.sch.uk/

Warminster School (01985 213038). Co-educational, age range 4-18. Day and boarding. www.warminsterschool.org.uk/

Leisure

Golfcourses: Marlborough (01672 512147); North Wiltshire, Bishops' Cannings (01380 860257); Salisbury and South Wiltshire, Netherhampton (01722 742645).

Hunts: the Wilton, the South and West Wiltshire, the Avon Vale and the Tedworth.

Fishing: rivers Kennet, Avon, Wylye and Nadder.

THE BEST WILTSHIRE COUNTRY HOUSES FOR SALE IN 2004
(A breakdown of what was for sale & purchase prices)

Pythouse, Tisbury (Grade II* house, 95 acres): £7m

Eastcourt Estate, Malmesbury (Grade II* Cotswold House, 172 acres): £4.75m

South Wraxall Manor, Bradford-on-Avon (historic manor, 252 acres): £4.075m

Cowick Farm, Calne (6 bed period house, 483 acres): £3.25m

Corton Manor, Hilmarton (Grade II Manor, 397 acres): £2.7m

Manr House, Kington Langley ('perfect village house', 4.95 acres): £2.75m

Country Life - June 2005

[Back to Coverage page]

To benefit from the Sands Home Search service, please call in confidence on 01425 462 549 / 01425 462 549
  


  

COUNTRY, EQUESTRIAN, FARM & WATERSIDE PROPERTY SEARCH AGENTS
 

© 2000 - 2009 Sands Home Search, Propertysearch & Corporate Relocation. All rights reserved | Links | Privacy
Tel: 01425 462 549 / +44 1425 462 549 | Email:
inbox@sandshomesearch.com | Link to us | Property Search Questionnaire

Sands Home Search provide a property search and acquisition service
and our enviable reputation has been founded on our ability to access the finest property for sale in London, the UK Country, Equestrian, Waterside & Farm property market and Cape Town South Africa.


INFORMATION BY AREA - INCLUDING ESTATE AGENTS, PROPERTY SALE PRICES, SCHOOLS & CONFIDENTIALLY AVAILABLE PROPERTY FOR SALE
UK COUNTRY, EQUESTRIAN, WATERSIDE & FARM PROPERTY - UK COUNTRY ESTATE AGENTS, COUNTRY PROPERTY FOR SALE, PROPERTY SOLD, PROPERTY PRICES,
UK PRIVATE SCHOOLS & UK AREA INFORMATION - click on relevant area below
UK Country

South East of England

Berkshire
Buckinghamshire
East Sussex
Hampshire
Hertfordshire
Kent
Surrey
West Sussex
UK Country

South West of England


Avon
Cornwall
Devon
Dorset
Sandbanks
Hampshire
The New Forest
Isle of Wight

Somerset
Wiltshire
UK Country

Central Southern England and the Midlands

Gloucestershire
Herefordshire
Leicestershire
Oxfordshire
Northamptonshire
Shropshire
Staffordshire
Warwickshire
Worcestershire


East Anglia

Suffolk
Cambridgeshire
UK Country

North West of England

Cheshire

North East of England


Northumberland
Yorkshire



Jersey in the Channel Islands

CAPE TOWN PROPERTY - CAPE TOWN ESTATE AGENTS, PROPERTY FOR SALE, PROPERTY SOLD, PROPERTY PRICES, PRIVATE SCHOOLS & AREA INFORMATION - click on relevant area below
Cape Town, South Africa

Western Cape

Southern Suburbs

Bishopscourt
Claremont
Constantia
Groot Constantia
Klein Constantia
Kirstenbosch
Price Drive Constantia
Rondebosch
Stonehurst Security Estate Tokai
Silversteen Estate Steenberg
Silvertree Estate Tokai
Steenberg Estate
Steenberg Golf Estate
Swaanswyk
Tokai
Trovato
Upper Constantia
Upper Kenilworth
Upper Trovato Estate
Zwaanswyk





Cape Town, South Africa

Western Cape

Atlantic Seaboard


Cape Town Waterfront
Bakoven
Bantry Bay
Beach Estate
Camps Bay
City Bowl
Clifton
De Waterkant
Devils Peak
Fresnaye
Fresnaye Upper
Granger Bay
Green Point
Green Point Upper
Higgovale
High Cape
Hout Bay
Llandudno
Mouille Point
North Shore
Northoaks Estate
Oaktree Village
Oranjezicht
Sea Point
Sea Point Upper
Schotschekloof
Tamboerskloof
Three Anchor Bay
Waterfront / V&A Waterfront
Victoria & Albert Waterfront
Cape Town VA Marina
Cape Town VA Waterfront
Vredehoek
Zonnebloem
Cape Town, South Africa

Western Cape

Southern Peninsula

Boulders Beach
Cape Point
Capri
Clovelly
De Goede Hoop Estate, Noordhoek
Fish Hoek
Glencairn
Imhoff's Gift
Kalk bay
Klein Slangkop Kommejtie
Kommetjie
Murdock Valley
Noordhoek
Scarborough
Silverglade
Simon's Kloof
Simons Town
St James
Cape Town, South Africa

Western Cape

Northern Suburbs


Atlantic Beach
Atlantic Beach Golf Estate
Blouberg Beachfront
Blouberg Sands
Bloubergrant
Bloubergrise
Bloubergstrand

Century City
Melkbosstrand
Milnerton
Milnerton Ridge

Shelley Point
Shelley Point Golf Estate
Sunset Beach
Sunset Links
Table View
So whether you are looking for a prime main residential property in Cape Town or in one of Cape Town's Security Estates or Golf Estates, a quality Cape Town Guest House/B&B or Holiday Home Sands Home Search can definitely help.
LONDON PROPERTY - LONDON ESTATE AGENTS, PROPERTY FOR SALE, PROPERTY SOLD, PROPERTY PRICES, PRIVATE SCHOOLS & AREA INFORMATION - click on relevant area below
London

Barnes
Battersea
Bayswater
Belgravia
Belsize Park
Bishops Avenue
Bloomsbury
Bushy Hill
Cadogan Place
Campden Hill
Chelsea
Cheyne Walk
Chiswick
Clapham
Cottesmore Gardens
Covent Gardens
Curzon Street
London

Docklands
Earls Court
Eaton Square
Egerton Place
Fulham
Green Park
Grosvenor Square
Grove End Road
Grove Park Gardens
Hammersmith
Hampstead
Hampstead Garden Suburb
Hampstead Heath
Highgate
Holland Park
Hyde Park
Islington
Justice Walk
Kensington
Kensington Gardens
Kew
Kenwood
Kew Gardens
Kingston Upon Thames
Knightsbridge
London

Ladbroke Gardens
Maida Vale
Marble Arch
Marylebone
Mayfair
Melbury Road
Mill Hill
Notting Hill
Oakhill Avenue
Ovington Gardens
Park Lane
Pembridge Gardens
Phillimore Estate
Pimlico
Porchester Terrace
Primrose Hill
Putney
Regents Park
Queens Park
Richmond
London

Shepherds Bush
South Kensington
St James Park
St Johns Wood
Sussex Square
The Bishops Avenue
Totteridge
Twickenham
Upper Grosvenor Street
Upper Phillimore Gardens
Wandsworth
Warwick Square
Westminster
Wilton Crescent
Wimbledon
Winnington Road
Wycombe Square
SW1, SW3, SW13, W8, W11, W12, W14, NW3, N20